Commercialised christmas

Anti-corporate jive and suggested alternatives to help support local/small business.
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dave-brown
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Commercialised christmas

Postby dave-brown » Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:57 pm

yes its that time of year again, that time of year for increased advertising, mass profits, mass consumerism and Mass (if ur catholic)

christmas =shit basically, im partially religious and the amount of counsumerism which takes place during december and the surplus of commercialism makes me want to eat shit.

Coke is partially to blame for the increased commercialism, ev er since they brought in santa clause to sell coke, and their annual cocacola chrismas in the park etc etc

christmas also fucks me off as we live in new zealand, and all the crappy decorations we invest in, feature little santas in snow boots. its fucking summer. We dont live in europe or america, so why should we purchase goods designed for the seasons of foreign countries, and yes they are predominantley manufactured in china

Im tryna do all my shopping at trade aid and save the children stores. or even making some, diy , but im pretty lazy at the moment, so the diy probably wont get very far. But i tinhk shopping at fair trade or charity stores is a good way to avoid supporting large corporations.

that is my bitching for the day.

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Dinner
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Postby Dinner » Fri Dec 09, 2005 3:28 pm

Or buying from markets etc. That way you are supporting basically the one or two people who make the stuff. And it's generally cheap.

I dunno. Christmas is good, in the sense that you spend time with family, people that mean alot to you, etc and giving people gifts is cool. But I totally agree with the whole consumerism thing. BUY BUY BUY. That sucks. But is there anywhere where it isn't present? Really? There's always a bunch of dicks somewhere trying to (and alot of the time succeeding quite well) make money off anything they can. Personally, I choose to ignore that side of it, although at times it can be a bit hard, 'coz I don't wanna find myself being pissed off at something I can't control. Especially in summer.

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Big Bird
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Postby Big Bird » Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:47 pm

everyones getting homebrew and pot plants off me, or possibly something from the re-gifting box (crap from last year that can be "re-gifted")
come 'ere

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deh
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Postby deh » Fri Dec 09, 2005 5:15 pm

I quite enjoy christmas, people in general seem to be more cheerful, family gatherings, good food, alcoholism, good times.
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Postby haylee » Fri Dec 09, 2005 10:43 pm

last year i asked someone idf i could use their lighter. thy handed it t me and said merry xmas! and walked off. that was cool. i needed that lighter.
pffffft

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scurvy_cur
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Postby scurvy_cur » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:41 am

Hehe man you guys really are anti-xmas aren't you? I don't mind christmas because I get free stuff...and I mean what's so wrong about people cashing in on a religious holiday? I mean they have to earn a living somehow...

Plus people do help other people out and give presents to those who wouldn't receive them normally, yes I agree that there shouldn't be just one day that we're told to do that and that these people only help them out at christmas time but I think it's good that they have a set time to do that because if they didn't, then they might not at all and that's just really sad.

So just be happy that people are good at least once a year and who cares about people exchanging gifts for christmas? It's a nice way to show that they care...
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Postby scurvy_cur » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:59 am

Santa
Claus is perhaps the most remarkable of all the figures associated with Christmas. To us, Santa has always been an essential part of the Christmas celebration, but the modern image of Santa didn't develop until well into the 19th century. Moreover, he didn't spring to life fully-formed as a literary creation or a commercial invention (as did his famous reindeer, Rudolph). Santa Claus was an evolutionary creation, brought about by the fusion of two religious personages (St. Nicholas and Christkindlein, the Christ child) to become a fixed image which is now the paramount symbol of the secular Christmas celebration

In 1804, the New York Historical Society was founded with Nicholas as its patron saint, its members reviving the Dutch tradition of St. Nicholas as a gift-bringer. In 1809, Washington Irving published his satirical A History of New York, by one "Diedrich Knickerbocker," a work that poked fun at New York's Dutch past (St. Nicholas included). When Irving became a member of the Society the following year, the annual St. Nicholas Day dinner festivities included a woodcut of the traditional Nicholas figure (tall, with long robes) accompanied by a Dutch rhyme about "Sancte Claus" (in Dutch, "Sinterklaas"). Irving revised his History of New York in 1812, adding details about Nicholas' "riding over the tops of the trees, in that selfsame waggon wherein he brings his yearly presents to children." In 1821, a New York printer named William Gilley issued a poem about a "Santeclaus" who dressed all in fur and drove a sleigh pulled by one reindeer. Gilley's "Sante," however, was very short.

On Christmas Eve of 1822, another New Yorker, Clement Clarke Moore, wrote down and read to his children a series of verses; his poem was published a year later as "An Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas" (more commonly known today by its opening line, "'Twas the night before Christmas . . ."). Moore gave St. Nick eight reindeer (and named them all), and he devised the now-familiar entrance by chimney. Moore's Nicholas was still a small figure, however — the poem describes a "miniature sleigh" with a "little old driver."

Meanwhile, in parts of Europe such as Germany, Nicholas the gift-giver had been superseded by a representation of the infant Jesus (the Christ child, or "Christkindlein"). The Christkindlein accompanied Nicholas-like figures with other names (such as "Père Noël" in France), or he travelled with a dwarf-like helper (known in some places as "Pelznickel," or Nicholas with furs). Belsnickle (as Pelznickel was known in the German-American dialect of Pennsylvania) was represented by adults who dressed in furry disguises (including false whiskers), visited while children were still awake, and put on a scary performance. Gifts found by children the next morning were credited to Christkindlein, who had come while everyone was asleep. Over time, the non-visible Christkindlein (whose name mutated into "Kriss Kringle") was overshadowed by the visible Belsnickle, and both of them became confused with St. Nicholas and the emerging figure of Santa Claus.

The modern Santa Claus derived from these two images: St. Nicholas the elf-like gift bringer described by Moore, and a friendlier "Kriss Kringle" amalgam of the Christkindlein and Pelznickel figures. The man-sized version of Santa became the dominant image around 1841, when a Philadelphia merchant named J.W. Parkinson hired a man to dress in "Criscringle" clothing and climb the chimney outside his shop.

In 1863, a caricaturist for Harper's Weekly named Thomas Nast began developing his own image of Santa. Nast gave his figure a "flowing set of whiskers" and dressed him "all in fur, from his head to his foot." Nast's 1866 montage entitled "Santa Claus and His Works" established Santa as a maker of toys; an 1869 book of the same name collected new Nast drawings with a poem by George P. Webster that identified the North Pole as Santa's home. Although Nast never settled on one size for his Santa figures (they ranged from elf-like to man-sized), his 1881 "Merry Old Santa Claus" drawing is quite close to the modern-day image.

The Santa Claus figure, although not yet standardized, was ubiquitous by the late 19th century. Santa was portrayed as both large and small; he was usually round but sometimes of normal or slight build; and he dressed in furs (like Belsnickle) or cloth suits of red, blue, green, or purple. A Boston printer named Louis Prang introduced the English custom of Christmas cards to America, and in 1885 he issued a card featuring a red-suited Santa. The chubby Santa with a red suit (like an "overweight superhero") began to replace the fur-dressed Belsnickle image and the multicolored Santas.

At the beginning of the 1930s, the burgeoning Coca-Cola company was still looking for ways to increase sales of their product during winter, then a slow time of year for the soft drink market. They turned to a talented commercial illustrator named Haddon Sundblom, who created a series of memorable drawings that associated the figure of a larger than life, red-and-white garbed Santa Claus with Coca-Cola. Coke's annual advertisements — featuring Sundblom-drawn Santas holding bottles of Coca-Cola, drinking Coca-Cola, receiving Coca-Cola as gifts, and especially enjoying Coca-Cola — became a perennial Christmastime feature which helped spur Coca-Cola sales throughout the winter (and produced the bonus effect of appealing quite strongly to children, an important segment of the soft drink market). The success of this advertising campaign has helped fuel the legend that Coca-Cola actually invented the image of the modern Santa Claus, decking him out in a red-and-white suit to promote the company colors — or that at the very least, Coca-Cola chose to promote the red-and-white version of Santa Claus over a variety of competing Santa figures in order to establish it as the accepted image of Santa Claus.

This legend is not true. Although some versions of the Santa Claus figure still had him attired in various colors of outfits past the beginning of the 20th century, the jolly, ruddy, sack-carrying Santa with a red suit and flowing white whiskers had become the standard image of Santa Claus by the 1920s, several years before Sundlom drew his first Santa illustration for Coca-Cola. As The New York Times reported on 27 November 1927:

A standardized Santa Claus appears to New York children. Height, weight, stature are almost exactly standardized, as are the red garments, the hood and the white whiskers. The pack full of toys, ruddy cheeks and nose, bushy eyebrows and a jolly, paunchy effect are also inevitable parts of the requisite make-up.
It's simply mind-boggling that at the beginning the 21st century, historians are still egregiously perpetuating inaccurate information like the following:

So complete was the colonization of Christmas that Coke's Santa had elbowed aside all comers by the 1940s. He was the Santa of the 1947 movie Miracle on 34th Street just as he is the Santa of the recent film The Santa Clause. He is the Santa on Hallmark cards, he is the Santa riding the Norelco shaver each Christmas season, he is the department-store Santa, and he is even the Salvation Army Santa!1
As we just pointed out above, the modern Santa had "elbowed aside all comers" long before the 1940s, and well before Coca-Cola co-opted him as their wintertime advertising symbol. And we're at a loss to understand how anyone could have recognized the Santa of Miracle on 34th Street, a BLACK-AND-WHITE film, as the red-and-white Coca-Cola Santa.

All this isn't to say that Coca-Cola didn't have anything to do with cementing that image of Santa Claus in the public consciousness. The Santa image may have been standardized before Coca-Cola adopted it for their advertisements, but Coca-Cola had a great deal to do with establishing Santa Claus as a ubiquitous Christmas figure in America at a time when the holiday was still making the transition from a religious observance to a largely secular and highly commercial celebration. In an era before color television (or commercial television of any kind), color films, and the widespread use of color in newspapers, it was Coca-Cola's magazine advertisements, billboards, and point-of-sale store displays that exposed nearly everyone in America to the modern Santa Claus image. Coca-Cola certainly helped make Santa Claus one of the most popular men in America, but they didn't invent him.
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BanalityDUFF
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Postby BanalityDUFF » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:42 pm

punk_in_drublic wrote:Hehe man you guys really are anti-xmas aren't you? I don't mind christmas because I get free stuff...and I mean what's so wrong about people cashing in on a religious holiday? I mean they have to earn a living somehow...


i didn't get anything. so eff christmas. :o

i call it present day now though, not that i got any presents :x

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Postby crain » Fri Dec 30, 2005 12:41 am

crack niggaz.
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Postby Ph!1 » Fri Dec 30, 2005 10:55 am

crain is the only real anti-christmas advocate to speak so far, he is involved in the high-profile protest against the comercialisation of christmas known as santarchy, these brave young men and women put their freedom on the line to claim back our sacred holiday, you blithering idiots babbling on the internet will not effect any real change, its the warriors in red suits and beards who publicly urinate and shoplift softdrinks who are making a real difference.

you should be ashamed, you plastic activists.



:wink:

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Postby scurvy_cur » Fri Dec 30, 2005 7:15 pm

Wax wrote:crain is the only real anti-christmas advocate to speak so far, he is involved in the high-profile protest against the comercialisation of christmas known as santarchy, these brave young men and women put their freedom on the line to claim back our sacred holiday, you blithering idiots babbling on the internet will not effect any real change, its the warriors in red suits and beards who publicly urinate and shoplift softdrinks who are making a real difference.

you should be ashamed, you plastic activists.


You have a comment for everything. I don't see how the people in santa suits made a difference at all...nobody REALLY thought they were santa and nobody decided NOT to celebrate christmas because they were out on the streets and I'm not even sure if that was the point, I think the point was more to have fun and get drunk in Santa suits.

And I don't think Dave and co. think that they were going to make a difference, retard. It was just a bitch. So leave them alone
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Postby Ph!1 » Sat Dec 31, 2005 2:20 pm

:lol:

crain
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Postby crain » Sat Dec 31, 2005 2:42 pm

punk_in_drublic wrote:
Wax wrote:crain is the only real anti-christmas advocate to speak so far, he is involved in the high-profile protest against the comercialisation of christmas known as santarchy, these brave young men and women put their freedom on the line to claim back our sacred holiday, you blithering idiots babbling on the internet will not effect any real change, its the warriors in red suits and beards who publicly urinate and shoplift softdrinks who are making a real difference.

you should be ashamed, you plastic activists.


You have a comment for everything. I don't see how the people in santa suits made a difference at all...nobody REALLY thought they were santa and nobody decided NOT to celebrate christmas because they were out on the streets and I'm not even sure if that was the point, I think the point was more to have fun and get drunk in Santa suits.

And I don't think Dave and co. think that they were going to make a difference, retard. It was just a bitch. So leave them alone

GEEEEEET FUUUUUCKKEEEED
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scurvy_cur
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Postby scurvy_cur » Sun Jan 01, 2006 6:26 pm

Who? Why?
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Postby PertHJ » Sun Jan 01, 2006 7:58 pm

Wax wrote:
:wink:
http://hungjurynz.bandcamp.com/
http://www.discogs.com/user/pertHJ

Drinking beers, hell yeah!! Smoking dope, KICK TO THROAT!!

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Postby dave-brown » Sun Jan 01, 2006 8:22 pm

punk_in_drublic wrote:
Wax wrote:crain is the only real anti-christmas advocate to speak so far, he is involved in the high-profile protest against the comercialisation of christmas known as santarchy, these brave young men and women put their freedom on the line to claim back our sacred holiday, you blithering idiots babbling on the internet will not effect any real change, its the warriors in red suits and beards who publicly urinate and shoplift softdrinks who are making a real difference.

you should be ashamed, you plastic activists.


You have a comment for everything. I don't see how the people in santa suits made a difference at all...nobody REALLY thought they were santa and nobody decided NOT to celebrate christmas because they were out on the streets and I'm not even sure if that was the point, I think the point was more to have fun and get drunk in Santa suits.

And I don't think Dave and co. think that they were going to make a difference, retard. It was just a bitch. So leave them alone


i thought i was gona make a difference, and i did. an extremely fucking small one. but the thirty odd bux i spent at save the children was thirty odd bux those kids didnt have before. same goes for the warehouse where i usually shop 4 christmas, the fuckers didnt get a cent off me.
"you say i make no difference, but atleast im fucking trying "

woop woop

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scurvy_cur
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Postby scurvy_cur » Sun Jan 01, 2006 8:36 pm

dave-brown wrote:
punk_in_drublic wrote:
Wax wrote:crain is the only real anti-christmas advocate to speak so far, he is involved in the high-profile protest against the comercialisation of christmas known as santarchy, these brave young men and women put their freedom on the line to claim back our sacred holiday, you blithering idiots babbling on the internet will not effect any real change, its the warriors in red suits and beards who publicly urinate and shoplift softdrinks who are making a real difference.

you should be ashamed, you plastic activists.


You have a comment for everything. I don't see how the people in santa suits made a difference at all...nobody REALLY thought they were santa and nobody decided NOT to celebrate christmas because they were out on the streets and I'm not even sure if that was the point, I think the point was more to have fun and get drunk in Santa suits.

And I don't think Dave and co. think that they were going to make a difference, retard. It was just a bitch. So leave them alone


i thought i was gona make a difference, and i did. an extremely fucking small one. but the thirty odd bux i spent at save the children was thirty odd bux those kids didnt have before. same goes for the warehouse where i usually shop 4 christmas, the fuckers didnt get a cent off me.
"you say i make no difference, but atleast im fucking trying "

woop woop


I meant by the post specifically...as in by posting this you were having a bitch more than expecting to everyone stop celebrating xmas etc.
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Re: Commercialised christmas

Postby flinders_ » Mon Jan 02, 2006 11:10 am

Ah a group of people with (roughly) the same views (Commecial Xmas=Shit) arquing over who's the most Anti Xmas.

How PunkAs is that!


dave-brown wrote:that is my bitching for the day.
leith wrote:get drunk as fuck.. smoke weed all the next day and get drunk again.


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