Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

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the croc
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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby the croc » Wed Jun 24, 2009 9:06 am

Just picked up this book yesterday:

Image

It's awesome. It's split into seven chapters:

(1) The Meaning of Self Sufficiency
(2) Food from the Garden
(3) Food from Nature
(4) In the kitchen
(5) Energy and Waste
(6) Crafts and Skills
(7) Things You Need to Know
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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby dustbinflowers » Wed Jun 24, 2009 9:39 am

John Seymour is a bit of a guru in this area- I have one of his older self sufficiency books- it goes into everything at an acre, 3 acres, 10 acres. Very cool.
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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby the croc » Thu Jun 25, 2009 11:55 pm

There's a 3 month permaculture course coming up at Riverside Community in Motueka in September if anyone is interested.

THE COURSE IS FOR PEOPLE WHO WANT TO:
• sustain themselves and their communities by growing and processing their own food
• share these practical life skills with others
• live co-operatively in an intentional community
• make a difference by contributing to the creation of a sustainable world
• expand their horizons and enrich their lives.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a ‘hands-on’ internship style course where participants primarily learn through doing.
Learning will be interactive and tailored to individual learning styles. Each day includes
some classroom tutoring, outdoor practical activities, self-directed study and community
living skills. The main teachers are Riverside Community members, complemented by local
guest tutors.

The core curriculum
• Our living earth, Gaia — the big picture
• Soil — this miraculous source of life
• Vegetable and fruit production and processing — from tilth to table
• Permaculture design and implementation — working within the cycles of nature. Additional course activities
• Basic natural building and related technologies
• Community living
• Effective communication
• Deepening our connection with nature
• Introduction to traditional Maori approaches to the land
• Bio-regional sustainability

Additional crafting skills
According to their interests, participants will have the opportunity to learn additional skills offered by Riverside residents (for example creative woodwork, weaving with natural materials,
healthy cooking, cheese making) as well as being able to participate in local activities (for
example yoga classes, Transition Towns groups). The standard permaculture (sustainable landuse design) curriculum is integrated into the internship. An internationally recognised
certificate will be issued upon completion.

A typical day
The programme and its daily rhythms are built around the cultural and seasonal calendars of
spring and early summer.
Morning — theoretical and practical skills:
learning and working in the gardens.
Afternoon — own research/study, crafting or
culinary skills, other practical sessions, planting.

COURSE VENUE
This residential course will be held at Riverside — NZ’s oldest intentional community — which was founded in 1942 by WWII conscientious objectors. It is situated on 200 ha of land in the beautiful Moutere Valley, remains agriculturally based, and continues its dedication to social justice and peace. The community is primarily supported by a dairy farm and livestock, a café and through selling horticultural products. Riverside’s Community and Cultural Centre is an attractive venue which is also used by the wider community. The Centre includes a modern
commercial kitchen. Participants will be accommodated in their own rooms within the hostel facility, and will cater for themselves using seasonal food produced on the land.

For more information on Riverside, visit:
http://www.riverside.org.nz

BIOGRAPHIES OF MAIN TUTORS
Philip Vincent
Philip is a holistic thinker who has lived at Riverside for 30 years. He has many land-based skills to share, including building with earth and timber, and has expertise in plumbing and water supply. He helped build and maintain the Community’s bio-gas producing sewage treatment plant. Philip initiated and then managed Riverside’s BioGro certified orchards and berry-fruit gardens from 1989-1996. He is currently developing new gardens, and his vision for these includes vegetable growing, field crops, a plant nursery, and a large range of fruiting trees and bushes. Philip is motivated by a deep sense of ‘Gaia’ — and an ever– developing awareness of ‘deep ecology’.

Verena Gruner
Verena is originally from Germany, and immigrated to New Zealand in 1981. She has
lived in communities for over 30 years, including Riverside. Verena has been a gardener for 20
years and also specialises in food processing of all kinds. She has a particular interest in
democratic education, and is a co-founder of Mountain Valley alternative primary school. She
has also organised numerous festivals, concerts, and educational workshops.

Robina McCurdy (main permaculture tutor)
Robina is a co-founder and resident of Tui Land Trust community, and is founder/trustee of the Institute for Earthcare Education Aotearoa. For 25 years she has worked nationally and internationally in community development, permaculture design and tutoring, organic growing, the development of environmental education resources and the creation of participatory processes for decision-making and collective action. Robina currently works as the Victory Community Garden co-ordinator and organic growing trainer for the Nelson area.

COURSE DETAILS
Number of Participants: 8
Course length: 12 weeks
Cost:
New Zealand participants: $280 per week
Overseas participants: $350 per week
Includes: accommodation, food, Internet access, educational materials, comprehensive
library, tuition (practical hands-on and theoretical).
• The fee includes a part work exchange component.
• For equalisation reasons, the fee is lower for NZ residents than for overseas participants.

Enquiries and registrations of interest to:
Sylvia Bauer: sylviabauer@gmail.com
Phone 64 3 526 7890
Cell 27 426 7803
Please:
• include name, age, sex, nationality, physical limitations and special needs.
• state your motivation for doing this course and how you envision applying what you learn after completing it.
• describe your experience and any qualifications in: organic growing, permaculture design, building, forestry, animal management, community organisation, community living, or other
relevant experience. Soon after receiving your registration of interest we will contact you for an interview, and if accepted for the programme, a deposit of $350 is required two weeks later to hold your place. The final payment is due on final registration date. As there are only eight places available, early registration is encouraged.

Final Registration Date: Friday 21 Aug 2009

Course Runs 21 September — 13 December 2009

This pilot programme is being hosted and developed by Riverside Community Trust Board,
in conjunction with the Institute of Earthcare Education Aotearoa. A similar programme is planned to take place at Tui Community in Golden Bay in autumn, 2010. Contact Inna: earthcarenz@gmail.com.
Last edited by the croc on Fri Jun 26, 2009 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby xSUSPECTx » Sun Jun 28, 2009 11:00 am

this work on maori agriculture might be interesting to those who are interested in permaculture.
it seems to show a lot of the same respect for the land that the philosphy of permaculture espouses.

In breaking up new land or when digging fern root several men might work together, standing in a row and so breaking out a long section of earth. In preparing the soil for planting a different method was adopted. The soil was not turned over; it was not even all dug. The sweet potato was planted in little mounds, and these were spaced in a very regular manner. Only at these spots where the seed tubers were to be planted was the soil dug. To prepare such a spot the digger thrust his ko into the ground three times, and, by pressing the shaft down loosened the soil by means of the upward movement of the point. Thus the spade was used as a lever is, and not as we manipulate a spade. The three thrusts of the spade were made at different parts of the circumference of the small area where the mound was to be formed, as [gap — reason: illegible] The performance loosened the soil, broke it up and raised it; the next operation was the pulverising of the clods, which was done with a wooden club, after which the soil was further worked and loosened, roots, etc., were cast aside, and the finely worked soil formed into small mounds ready to receive the seed tubers.


http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/tei-B ... dy-d8.html
Carly Ngarotata-Simon wrote:U misd two commas u illiterate fuk. It should read...mainstream, whilst at the same time, ... Who da dumb cunt now. Im bilingual. I can txt speak n also write in 'proper' english havin bn a legal secretary 4 13 years. So im actualy fukn streams ahead in inteligence ova u. Plus i hav a life! I dnt waste my time typing evry leta out cos i have a life! Dum ass. Peace, im out. Hahahahaha

Spots2012 wrote:do animal rights activists vehemently oppose Maori eating pigs etc, or are they willing to let that one slide?

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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby the croc » Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:00 pm

A couple of books I've picked lately on this topic:

Image

At the age of seventeen, Eustace Conway ditched the comforts of his suburban existence to escape to the wild. Away from the crushing disapproval of his father, he lived alone in a teepee in the mountains. Everything he needed he built, grew or killed. He made his clothes from deer he killed and skinned before using their sinew as sewing thread. But he didn't stop there. In the years that followed, he stopped at nothing in pursuit of bigger, bolder challenges. He travelled the Mississippi in a handmade wooden canoe; he walked the two-thousand-mile Appalachian Trail; he hiked across the German Alps in trainers; he scaled cliffs in New Zealand. One Christmas, he finished dinner with his family and promptly upped and left - to ride his horse across America. From South Carolina to the Pacific, with his little brother in tow, they dodged cars on the highways, ate road kill and slept on the hard ground. Now, more than twenty years on, Eustace is still in the mountains, residing in a thousand-acre forest where he teaches survival skills and attempts to instil in people a deeper appreciation of nature. But over time he has had to reconcile his ambitious dreams with the sobering realities of modernity. Told with Elizabeth Gilbert's trademark wit and spirit, this is a fascinating, intimate portrait of an endlessly complicated man: a visionary, a narcissist, a brilliant but flawed modern hero. The Last American Man is an unforgettable adventure story of an irrepressible life lived to the extreme. The Last American Man is a New York Times Notable Book and National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist.


This was really awesome. Pretty out of it dude, makes Bear Griffiths (who is a fake anyway) and Survivorman (apparently more legit) look like amateurs. After reading Bill Bryson's Walk in the Woods on the Appalachian Trail and the dangers of the trail it makes Eustace Conway's achievements that much more real. Despite all his flaws (and there are many) he's still a very inspirational guy who makes me want to get outside and do stuff even more. Highly recommended for anyone into outdoors stuff. The author Elizabeth Gilbert sounds like a pretty amazing person herself, really keen to read Eat, Pray, Love now which chronicles her own life.

http://www.fishpond.co.nz/Books/Science/Nature/General/product_info/13694892/?cf=3&rid=2016761854&i=1&keywords=the+last+american+man

Image

This classic of the back-to-the-land movement is packed with solid, timeless information. Written by a renowned horticulturist, it has taught generations how to make their land self-sufficient, with explanations of organic farming techniques and reliable advice on other topics, including irrigation, livestock, crops, greenhouses, fertilizers, much more.


Only had a quick flick through this, but looks really comprehensive. It was written in the 1940s so some of the stuff has been outdated, such as lead lining water tanks etc, but most of it is still relevant.

http://www.fishpond.co.nz/Books/Science/Nature/General/product_info/847570/?cf=3&rid=256558771&i=1&keywords=five+acres+and+independence

Edit: changed title to better reflect rest of thread
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Fri Nov 13, 2009 2:56 pm

I just got Simply Living: A gatherers guide to New Zealand's fields, forests and shores by Gwen Skinner at Arty Bees today. Good section on seaweed.


First 13 pages are here:

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=_PYO ... q=&f=false
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby dustbinflowers » Wed Nov 18, 2009 12:33 pm

^^^^^^awesome book^^^

Used to find it really useful till someone stole it off me :x
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Sat Nov 28, 2009 10:08 pm

300 year old food forest in Vietnam

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5ZgzwoQ-ao[/youtube]
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby xSUSPECTx » Sat Nov 28, 2009 11:09 pm

that was awesome, like a garden of eden type dealio

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Sat Nov 28, 2009 11:43 pm

Just came across this one from the same guy on a 2000 year old food forest in Morocco

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hftgWcD-1Nw[/youtube]

Pretty rad how they're probably the origin of the idea of an oasis
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:18 pm

Cooked up a 100% organic wild caught/home-grown meal tonight (apart from the olive oil). Back leg steak from a doe my mate shot on Friday down Kaikoura ways sliced and fried with home-grown rosemary. Wild artichokes from his backyard roasted and garnished with home-grown curry plant leaf and chives. Purple beans and spinach from my vege garden. Pretty stoked with this. It tasted fucken good!

Image
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Image
Image
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby BigBadBazza » Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:15 pm

needs a mean ass gravy. bet it was tasty though.
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby dustbinflowers » Thu Apr 08, 2010 8:16 am

looks good.
had an awesome venison stew while I was down in Dunners last weekend- wild shot, with a pint of home brewed stout in it and slow cooked. Goood gravy. Served with urenikas out of the garden, and more beer

It felt like a fitting autumn dinner for old friends
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby Red_switch » Thu Apr 15, 2010 8:40 am

Venison is good, until you have it everyday...

Upside is plenty of hunters get pretty sick of it and are often keen to give it away/trade for shit.

Wild venison bacon is the new in thing it seems.

Hey Croc that book The Last American Man looks fricken rad.
I think it's lint.

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby xSUSPECTx » Fri Apr 23, 2010 5:30 pm

curry plant?
Carly Ngarotata-Simon wrote:U misd two commas u illiterate fuk. It should read...mainstream, whilst at the same time, ... Who da dumb cunt now. Im bilingual. I can txt speak n also write in 'proper' english havin bn a legal secretary 4 13 years. So im actualy fukn streams ahead in inteligence ova u. Plus i hav a life! I dnt waste my time typing evry leta out cos i have a life! Dum ass. Peace, im out. Hahahahaha

Spots2012 wrote:do animal rights activists vehemently oppose Maori eating pigs etc, or are they willing to let that one slide?

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Fri Apr 23, 2010 5:48 pm

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby xSUSPECTx » Fri Apr 23, 2010 6:35 pm

true i didnt actually think that stuff was edible.
Carly Ngarotata-Simon wrote:U misd two commas u illiterate fuk. It should read...mainstream, whilst at the same time, ... Who da dumb cunt now. Im bilingual. I can txt speak n also write in 'proper' english havin bn a legal secretary 4 13 years. So im actualy fukn streams ahead in inteligence ova u. Plus i hav a life! I dnt waste my time typing evry leta out cos i have a life! Dum ass. Peace, im out. Hahahahaha

Spots2012 wrote:do animal rights activists vehemently oppose Maori eating pigs etc, or are they willing to let that one slide?

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Fri Apr 23, 2010 6:47 pm

Well I'm not dead yet if that's any proof at all.
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby Yellow Romans » Thu May 27, 2010 9:40 pm

I haven't followed all of this thread but here are a few random facts that may or may not have been covered....

NZ is perfectly capable of producing all our own food (except for some tropical fruits, although very small bananas can be grown in Northland). The main problem is that our farming system has traditionally focussed on a very narrow range of products, and nowadays Fonterror want to turn the whole country into one huge dairy farm. It makes no sense that they are pushing dairy farming into some of the most arid parts of NZ, even though dairying requires more water than most (all?) other forms of livestock farming. They spout shit like it is needed to feed the hungry people of the world but they just market to the middle classes of Asia, who are in no danger of starving.
The reason we import so much is due to who owns the companies that produce food. eg We import some kinds of Cadbury chocolate from Tasmania, and export other kinds of Cadbury chocolates from Dunedin to Australia.
We could produce pasta here from NZ wheat but import it from Australia cos that's where the companies are based (the majority of the world's food trade is controlled by only a few companies who tend to centralise production). We import things like soya beans cos although non-gmo soya is grown here, factory farming (chickens) and cattle feedlots use up huge amounts of grain.
Having said that, I manage to get a lot of my food from a farmers' market so it is grown mostly within 100km of my house (as opposed to buying imported frozen spinach from Europe etc).

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby xSUSPECTx » Thu May 27, 2010 10:23 pm

Yellow Romans wrote:NZ is perfectly capable of producing all our own food


fuck, yeh.
Carly Ngarotata-Simon wrote:U misd two commas u illiterate fuk. It should read...mainstream, whilst at the same time, ... Who da dumb cunt now. Im bilingual. I can txt speak n also write in 'proper' english havin bn a legal secretary 4 13 years. So im actualy fukn streams ahead in inteligence ova u. Plus i hav a life! I dnt waste my time typing evry leta out cos i have a life! Dum ass. Peace, im out. Hahahahaha

Spots2012 wrote:do animal rights activists vehemently oppose Maori eating pigs etc, or are they willing to let that one slide?

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby akaxo » Fri May 28, 2010 12:26 pm

yeah that's true but if we want to import things like computers, TVs, cars, chinese jandals and hot'n'spicy korean noodles we need to export things right? and one thing we can do is produce and export food. not that i'm in favour of dairy farms popping up everywhere esp seeing as i live in canterbury, but there's more to it than just producing enough food to sustain the population.

just looked over the last couple of pages in this thread, that john seymour book croc posted about is bloody useful. i've got a well used copy of his complete guide to self-sufficiency, got dirt and blood splattered on a fair few pages now from referring to it in times of need ha. and the simply living one is good too but mine has disappeared somewhere along the line too bugger it.

as far as what we're doing in the city now, produce virtually all our own veges, haven't bought any in fuck knows how long. got five chickens running around in the backyard who get fed a lot of food from the local skip and give us eggs and a lot of smiles and laughs. built a fire bath in the backyard that gets used a few times a week and is powered off the wood from the massive oak tree that got cut up and left on our front yard in exchange for a couple of boxes of beer. used to brew and distill but don't drink anymore so don't now ha. have jars of preserves from the fruit trees and dumpstered fruit in the cupboard too. would like to be completely self sufficient for food and energy one day.
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby xSUSPECTx » Sat May 29, 2010 12:30 am

akaxo wrote:yeah that's true but if we want to import things like computers, TVs, cars, chinese jandals and hot'n'spicy korean noodles we need to export things right? and one thing we can do is produce and export food. not that i'm in favour of dairy farms popping up everywhere esp seeing as i live in canterbury, but there's more to it than just producing enough food to sustain the population.

yeh, im fairly sure we have enuff koreans of our own to make spicy noodles, im sure we can make our own jandals, we used to make our own cars, and im sure we can make our own tv's, maybe no iphones but fuck...

but youre right, i wouldnt say shut the border, but we dont actually need to rely on other countries so much or at very least, we dont need to act like we do.

mind you, cuba coped fine for 50 years :P
Carly Ngarotata-Simon wrote:U misd two commas u illiterate fuk. It should read...mainstream, whilst at the same time, ... Who da dumb cunt now. Im bilingual. I can txt speak n also write in 'proper' english havin bn a legal secretary 4 13 years. So im actualy fukn streams ahead in inteligence ova u. Plus i hav a life! I dnt waste my time typing evry leta out cos i have a life! Dum ass. Peace, im out. Hahahahaha

Spots2012 wrote:do animal rights activists vehemently oppose Maori eating pigs etc, or are they willing to let that one slide?

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Thu Mar 24, 2011 8:04 pm

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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby Fiction & Falsehood » Thu Mar 24, 2011 8:23 pm

cheers for that, it was really good, ive heard about lammas a lot but thats by far the most ive seen of them.
recognised 'that roundhouse' at the very end.
cool cats, but what was that guys belt for?
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby Fiction & Falsehood » Fri May 06, 2011 9:32 pm

fucks me off that if youre against one thing.. i.e. rampant capitalism, that automatically means youre an ardent supporter of its perceived(by the particular fuckwit you happen to be talking to) opposite, such as some fucktard form of socialism or that you want to live in a cave and eat grass.

jeezus, this country doesnt really have much left of it re: human resource.
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby the croc » Sat Jun 11, 2011 5:14 am

Tillers International is a 501(c)3 IRS non-profit organization for international rural development, specializing in farming with oxen. Based in Scotts, Michigan, USA at our Cook's Mill Learning Center, Tillers offers classes in appropriate technology farming techniques, draft animal power, blacksmithing and metal work, timber framing, woodworking, cheesemaking, and many other farming and artisanal skills. Tillers also hosts interns, both international and domestic, and international guests for intensive periods of hands-on training. Whether you're looking for a new hobby, a new land or skill-based livelihood, or an opportunity to contribute your knowledge and skills to an international project, Tillers welcomes you and offers myriad unique, educational opportunities.


http://www.tillersinternational.org/index.html

ATTRA - National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service is managed by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) and is funded under a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture's Rural Business-Cooperative Service. It provides information and other technical assistance to farmers, ranchers, Extension agents, educators, and others involved in sustainable agriculture in the United States. (ATTRA was formerly known as the "Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas" project.)

https://attra.ncat.org/

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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby scott penk » Wed Jun 15, 2011 8:08 pm

the croc wrote:A couple of books I've picked lately on this topic:

Image



read your post last night, requested from library last night, got from library today! about to get into it

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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby the croc » Thu Jun 16, 2011 3:54 am

scott penk wrote:
the croc wrote:A couple of books I've picked lately on this topic:

Image



read your post last night, requested from library last night, got from library today! about to get into it


Yeah it's a pretty sweet read, was thinking of giving it another hoon.
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So let's get really smashed
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dustbinflowers
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Re: Self-sustainability/Back to the land etc

Postby dustbinflowers » Mon Jun 20, 2011 9:49 am

Yellow Romans wrote:I haven't followed all of this thread but here are a few random facts that may or may not have been covered....

NZ is perfectly capable of producing all our own food (except for some tropical fruits, although very small bananas can be grown in Northland). The main problem is that our farming system has traditionally focussed on a very narrow range of products, and nowadays Fonterror want to turn the whole country into one huge dairy farm. It makes no sense that they are pushing dairy farming into some of the most arid parts of NZ, even though dairying requires more water than most (all?) other forms of livestock farming. They spout shit like it is needed to feed the hungry people of the world but they just market to the middle classes of Asia, who are in no danger of starving.
The reason we import so much is due to who owns the companies that produce food. eg We import some kinds of Cadbury chocolate from Tasmania, and export other kinds of Cadbury chocolates from Dunedin to Australia.
We could produce pasta here from NZ wheat but import it from Australia cos that's where the companies are based (the majority of the world's food trade is controlled by only a few companies who tend to centralise production). We import things like soya beans cos although non-gmo soya is grown here, factory farming (chickens) and cattle feedlots use up huge amounts of grain.
Having said that, I manage to get a lot of my food from a farmers' market so it is grown mostly within 100km of my house (as opposed to buying imported frozen spinach from Europe etc).


NZ no longer could produce enough wheat- most of the country suitable has been switched over to intensive dairying. In some ways Australian wheat is better, as it at least has trace selenium and cobalt. Much of New Zealand's land is only agriculturally viable with large amounts of super Phosphate dressing- not really sustainable.
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the croc
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Re: Self-sustainable vegans

Postby the croc » Sat Jun 25, 2011 4:01 am

the croc wrote:
scott penk wrote:
the croc wrote:A couple of books I've picked lately on this topic:

Image



read your post last night, requested from library last night, got from library today! about to get into it


Yeah it's a pretty sweet read, was thinking of giving it another hoon.


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There's more to life than thrash
So let's get really smashed
and do the heavy head dance

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